The Draft Centre Plan Harms the Common- (some more)

Disruption to Halifax’s built environment proposed under the Centre Plan is of a scale equal to or greater than that of Cogswell and Africville together. Please attend the open houses (see schedule below) to inform yourself about the Centre Plan and provide feedback.
 
The Centre Plan is ignoring the on-going Halifax Common Master Plan Consultations

The draft Centre Plan threatens public enjoyment of the Halifax Common. The colours indicate increases to permitted height. This will lead to short or long-term demolitions of existing building and replacement with taller ones on and next to the Halifax Common.

and 1994 Halifax Common Plan.  Despite substantial evidence that high-rises are not the way to add density and that they kill liveability HRM continues to plan for high-rises at “Centres” next to (Robie & Quinpool ) or on (Southwest Spring Garden Road) the Halifax Common. And the plan increases heights for most of the perimeter of the Common for “Corridors” (traffic sewers) along Robie, Chebucto to Cunard, and along South Street. 
 
Although urban green space plays a huge role in mitigating the effect of climate change and nature improves mental and physical well-being HRM is not creating any new public green space for the peninsula just more shade and wind that will degrade what we have. Without knowing what the Plan will permit Capital Health or Dalhousie to do on the Halifax Common the Centre Plan is already drafting for continued incursions and enclosure of the Common. Especially troubling is the plan incentivizes short term or eventual demolition of hundreds of buildings and will result in on-going clashes with near-by properties.
 
A sensible solution to densifying the Centre Plan Area, would be to intensify land use development in areas where the character of the city would be the least affected. Examples include the 16 acre Cogswell Exchange, the large parcels of land designated as Future Growth Nodes (shopping malls and Shannon Park) or under-utilized commercial lots, vacant lots and automotive dealerships.
 
Instead the Centre Plan will disrupt many older, established neighbourhoods by increasing height limits along corridors (4-6 storeys), higher residential areas (4-6 storeys) and targeted growth areas (20-storeys). There is no consideration for the social, cultural, environmental, economic advantage of protecting Halifax’s built environment. Nor for protecting present or future opportunities for small-scale local businesses, women-owned businesses, affordability and diversity.
 
For details please see the interactive map.   Note, typical story height is 3.9 meters for offices, 3.1 meters for hotels or residences and 3.5 meters for mixed- use.
 

Open house meetings March 19-April 5:
Mon,  March 19, 6:30 – 8:30 pm: St. Joseph A. McKay Elementary School
Thurs March  22, 6-8 pm, NSCC Ivany (Waterfront) Campus
Mon,  March  26, 1-3 pm and 6 – 8 pm Dalhousie SUB
Wed,  March  28, 1-3 pm and 6 – 8 pm Mic Mac Aquatic Club
Tues  April 3   6 – 8pm Halifax Forum
Thurs April 5  1 – 3 and 6 – 8 pm Dartmouth North Community Centre

HRM’s recently released Centre Plan “Package A,” has plans for designated growth centres, corridors, higher order residential and future growth nodes. There are three documents: a planning strategy, a land-use bylaw and a design manual and a“Big Changes” summary